• Earnings extravaganza — What to know in the week ahead
    Yahoo Finance

    Earnings extravaganza — What to know in the week ahead

    Earnings will be the focal point for investors this week, as about a quarter of the S&P 500 companies gear up to report results.

  • Amazon Week 3 Highlights: Prices Get Close to $1,800
    Market Realist

    Amazon Week 3 Highlights: Prices Get Close to $1,800

    During the third week of October, Amazon Inc. (AMZN) stock rebound. Compared to week 1 and week 2, the third-week patterns were somewhat different.

  • What Are the Top Holdings of Fisher Asset Management?
    Market Realist

    What Are the Top Holdings of Fisher Asset Management?

    Kenneth Fisher is the founder of Fisher Asset Management LLC. He in July 2016. But now he's the executive chairman of Fisher Asset Management.

  • Netflix scores big with 'Breaking Bad' but streaming wars loom large
    Yahoo Finance

    Netflix scores big with 'Breaking Bad' but streaming wars loom large

    Netflix is betting heavily on original content slate, but the streaming wars loom large.

  • Space startup CEO: 'You need regulation' of space — there isn't 'a cop up there'
    Yahoo Finance

    Space startup CEO: 'You need regulation' of space — there isn't 'a cop up there'

    Adrian Steckel, CEO of OneWeb, believes space is a “shared resource” and calls for regulations to level the playing field.

  • NYC official calls for an NFL ‘Rooney Rule’ to boost executive diversity
    Yahoo Finance

    NYC official calls for an NFL ‘Rooney Rule’ to boost executive diversity

    Comptroller Scott Stringer recently sent a letter to over 50 S&P 500 companies calling to implement this policy when searching for new C-suite candidates.

  • How Thrive Global's latest deal puts it on a path to health care
    Yahoo Finance

    How Thrive Global's latest deal puts it on a path to health care

    Arianna Huffington’s Thrive Global is eyeing greater expansion into clinical operations with its latest acquisition of artificial intelligence platform Boundless Mind.

  • Big tech, big profits? Amazon sales poised to leap 24%
    The Guardian

    Big tech, big profits? Amazon sales poised to leap 24%

    Shares have risen fivefold in five years and despite the shadow over tech analysts bet Amazon is immune to a backlash. Remember when Silicon Valley was a force for good? With their young bosses, origins in garages and revolutionary products, US tech companies were worshipped for bringing information, choice and innovation to the world. As reporting season for the US tech sector revs up this week the sheen has come off as campaigners, politicians and the wider public have asked questions about the darker side of the digital revolution. Facebook, Amazon, Google’s parent, Alphabet, Microsoft and Apple are all reporting in the next couple of weeks. Misuse of people’s data, aggressive tax avoidance, treatment of workers, enabling hate speech and the sheer size and power of the tech giants are all in the spotlight. The US government is conducting an antitrust review and Elizabeth Warren, the new frontrunner for the 2020 Democratic nomination, has pledged to break up the digital monopolies. Amazon, which reports third-quarter results on Thursday, is a case in point. Jeff Bezos’s company has faced repeated questions about working conditions at its warehouses in the US and the UK, where it is running an ad campaign featuring happy workers. Critics hold it partly responsible for the crisis on the high street. Amazon’s sprawling business – from retail sales and computer gaming to advertising and entertainment streaming – is in Warren’s sights and in Britain the competition authorities are investigating its investment in Deliveroo. It could also be affected by proposals to make big tech companies pay more tax in countries where they make sales. The Seattle-based company has told investors to expect third-quarter sales to jump by as much as 24% to a maximum of $70bn as it piles on revenue from cloud computing and its Prime service’s one-day delivery offer. Operating profit, though, is set to fall from $3.7bn to between $2.1bn and $3.1bn as Amazon spends on transport to expand its fast delivery offer. Amazon’s shares have fallen by about 10% since disappointing second-quarter results in July as investors digested its heavy spending message, amid general wariness about the tech sector made worse by dud share sales by companies such as Uber, Lyft and Slack. Neil Campling, head of technology research at Mirabaud Securities, said: “There is an overhang on big tech at the moment which is weighing on Amazon. You have got very high expectations and companies with very high valuations, and when a sector is priced for perfection that creates extra risk.” The shares are worth more than six times what they were just five years ago and Wall Street analysts reckon there is more to come. The company has so many irons in the fire that it’s hard to understand what’s going on. Supporters have to believe that its size, ability to invest and Bezos’s relentless focus on keeping customers happy is a magic combination. Andrew Murphy, managing partner of US tech investor Loup Ventures, says Amazon is still a high-growth company because of its willingness to experiment, and will escape a forced break-up despite its size. “While they’ve demonstrated the capability of turning on the profitability spigot at will in a given quarter, they are still in investment mode,” Murphy said. “Amazon will experiment and spend to test seemingly anything.” Is Amazon a risk-taking innovator or a relentless sucker up of other people’s business? Campling points out that Amazon’s cloud service supports many other companies, “creating an economy of its own”, but adds that Amazon can use the information it gets from the service to move in on the next trend. “Amazon is affecting every part of our lives,” Campling said. “Some people will think it’s the devil and others will think it gives us choice.”

  • Reuters

    Goldman Sachs investment banker charged in insider trading scheme

    Bryan Cohen, a vice president at Goldman Sachs who works in the Consumer Retail industry group, was arrested early Friday on charges of conspiracy to commit securities fraud. Cohen is the third Goldman Sachs employee to be charged in an insider trading scheme since May 2018. Goldman Sachs spokeswoman Nicole Sharp said on Saturday the firm is "cooperating with the authorities on the situation regarding Mr. Cohen.

  • Illy Chairman: People drink coffee even when the economy slows
    Yahoo Finance

    Illy Chairman: People drink coffee even when the economy slows

    Illycaffe's Andrea Illy on why his company thinks now is the time to expand in the U.S. gourmet coffee market.

  • JNJ sheds light on why its settling some opioid cases instead of fighting in court
    Yahoo Finance

    JNJ sheds light on why its settling some opioid cases instead of fighting in court

    In this week’s Q3 earnings call, Johnson & Johnson's CFO shed some light on the company’s surprise decision to settle in Ohio.

  • Jetblue, Southwest top annual list of family-friendly airlines
    Yahoo Finance

    Jetblue, Southwest top annual list of family-friendly airlines

    Traveling with the family? Here are the best airlines to use, according to The Points Guy.

  • Financial Times

    Goldman Sachs banker charged with insider trading

    A Goldman Sachs banker has been charged with insider trading in a scheme that allegedly generated $2.6m in illegal profits as he tipped off a trader about multibillion-dollar deals involving bank clients like Syngenta. Bryan Cohen, a vice-president at Goldman, was arrested Friday on federal criminal conspiracy charges in New York and released on bail, according to court records. The SEC alleged Mr Cohen, 33, tipped off an unnamed trader about bids for Swiss agribusiness Syngenta in 2015 by Monsanto and ChemChina, and about Arby’s 2017 takeover of Buffalo Wild Wings in 2017.

  • Financial Times

    Hedge funds and mutual funds converge on US stock holdings

    About 12 per cent of the top 50 US stocks held as overweight positions by hedge funds and traditional mutual funds are owned by both sets of managers, according to Bank of America Merrill Lynch. Savita Subramanian, head of US equity and quantitative strategy at BofA, said strong momentum effects in the US market were one possible explanation.

  • What's Next for Netflix Stock After Q3 Earnings as Apple & Disney Launch?
    Zacks

    What's Next for Netflix Stock After Q3 Earnings as Apple & Disney Launch?

    Netflix's post-release positivity was short lived as NFLX stock fell Thursday and slipped another 6% Friday. Now what?

  • Could Microsoft Azure Be the Next Windows?
    Market Realist

    Could Microsoft Azure Be the Next Windows?

    Analyst Christopher Eberle reiterated a "buy" rating and a price target of $161 on Microsoft stock. He predicts that Azure could grow 61.6% in Q1.

  • Are Q3 2019 Earnings Results Really That Good?
    Zacks

    Are Q3 2019 Earnings Results Really That Good?

    Are Q3 2019 Earnings Results Really That Good?

  • Stocks - S&P Knocked Down by Boeing, JNJ, China
    Investing.com

    Stocks - S&P Knocked Down by Boeing, JNJ, China

    Investing.com – Stocks finished the week on a down note on slumps in Boeing and Johnson & Johnson, plus new worries about Chinese economic growth.

  • Boeing and JNJ Drag Dow Lower, End Week in Red
    Market Realist

    Boeing and JNJ Drag Dow Lower, End Week in Red

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average Index lost close to 260 points or 0.95% today. Boeing stock (BA) fell 6.73%, the biggest loss in the Dow today.

  • Will Twitter (TWTR) Stock Continue Its 2019 Success After Q3 Earnings?
    Zacks

    Will Twitter (TWTR) Stock Continue Its 2019 Success After Q3 Earnings?

    Twitter (TWTR) is set to report its third quarter results on Thursday, October 24 before the opening bell.

  • Will Chipotle's (CMG) Dominance Continue with Its Q3 Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Will Chipotle's (CMG) Dominance Continue with Its Q3 Earnings Report?

    Chipotle (CMG) is set to report its third quarter results after the closing bell Tuesday, October 22.

  • 3 Tech Stocks for Growth Investors to Buy During Q3 Earnings Season
    Zacks

    3 Tech Stocks for Growth Investors to Buy During Q3 Earnings Season

    Let's dive into three tech stocks that we found using our Zacks Stock Screener that growth investors might want to consider buying during Q3 2019 earnings season...

  • Top Analyst Reports for Facebook, UnitedHealth & HSBC
    Zacks

    Top Analyst Reports for Facebook, UnitedHealth & HSBC

    Top Analyst Reports for Facebook, UnitedHealth & HSBC

  • More Delays Cast a Shadow over Boeing MAX’s Return
    Market Realist

    More Delays Cast a Shadow over Boeing MAX’s Return

    Southwest Airlines announced that it had removed all Boeing MAX aircraft from its flight schedules until February 8—its seventh extension in seven months.

  • Johnson & Johnson recalls baby powder after asbestos found
    The Guardian

    Johnson & Johnson recalls baby powder after asbestos found

    Company said 33,000 bottles will be recalled amid lawsuits alleging they knew the baby powder was contaminated. Johnson & Johnson has voluntarily recalled a single batch of its baby powder after US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulators found trace amounts of asbestos in the product. The company said 33,000 bottles of talcum powder will be recalled “out of an abundance of caution”. The recall comes amid thousands of lawsuits alleging the company knew its baby powder was contaminated with asbestos, a carcinogen. Johnson & Johnson strenuously denied the claims. This is the first time the company has recalled its leading baby powder product. The same day, the Arizona attorney general announced a $116m settlement against the company, related to its transvaginal mesh implants. The company is also being sued over its role in the US opioids crisis, in a challenging period for its reputation as one of the most trusted brands in the world. Johnson & Johnson said in a statement that tests conducted by the FDA found sub-trace levels of chrysotile asbestos contamination at concentrations not exceeding 0.00002% in a single bottle purchased from an online retailer. The recall applies to lot #22318RB. The company said it could not confirm whether the sample was cross-contaminated, whether the product’s seal was intact, or whether the sample was taken from an authentic bottle of Johnson & Johnson talcum powder. The company said it has conducted “thousands of tests over the past 40 years repeatedly to confirm that our consumer talc products do not contain asbestos”. Although pediatricians have advised against using talcum powder on infants for decades, arguing there is a risk of inhalation and infection to babies, talcum powder has remained Johnson & Johnson’s best-known household staple. The product is made from pure talc, a mineral which often appears in veins alongside asbestos in the earth. “Our talc comes from ore sources confirmed to meet our stringent specifications that exceed industry standards,” the company said. “Not only do we and our suppliers routinely test to ensure our talc does not contain asbestos, our talc has also been tested and confirmed to be asbestos-free by a range of independent laboratories, universities and global health authorities.” Concerns have also been raised about the health impacts of talc itself. For decades, talc was routinely used as a dry lubricant in condoms and latex gloves, until physicians raised health concerns about talc, particularly for women. In a series of investigations by the New York Times and Reuters, internal documents from Johnson & Johnson revealed some company executives worried about the talcum products, including possible asbestos contamination, further government regulation and public backlash over health concerns.