^N225 - Nikkei 225

Osaka - Osaka Delayed Price. Currency in JPY
22,195.38
+485.38 (+2.24%)
At close: 3:15PM JST
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Previous close21,710.00
Open21,947.58
Volume0
Day's range21,919.83 - 22,214.59
52-week range16,358.19 - 24,115.95
Avg. volume77,691
  • Stocks rise on hope that worst of economic plunge has passed
    Associated Press

    Stocks rise on hope that worst of economic plunge has passed

    Asian shares surged Friday on optimism the worst of the economic fallout from the pandemic may be over, as Wall Street logged its biggest rally in a week. Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 jumped 1.8% to 20,025.91. Hong Kong's Hang Seng rose 1% to 24,220.86, while the Shanghai Composite picked up 0.7% to 2,891.83.

  • Stocks climb on China trade relief, while U.S. jobs data dents dollar
    Reuters

    Stocks climb on China trade relief, while U.S. jobs data dents dollar

    World shares rose on Thursday after China's exports came in far stronger than expected, suggesting an economic recovery was under way, but the dollar fell from two-week highs as U.S. data showed millions more Americans joined the ranks of the unemployed. Gold jumped 2% as the weak U.S. data heightened fears over a coronavirus-induced global downturn. Initial U.S. jobless claims for unemployment benefits totaled a seasonally adjusted 3.169 million for the week ended May 2, down from a revised 3.846 million in the prior week, the Labor Department's weekly report showed.

  • Asia stocks set to track soft Wall Street lead amid pandemic worries
    Reuters

    Asia stocks set to track soft Wall Street lead amid pandemic worries

    Asian stocks were set to come under pressure on Thursday as downbeat economic data pushed investors to safe havens and growing worries about falling demand sent oil prices lower. Traders continue to be torn between signs that consumers and businesses are emerging from the economic paralysis caused by the coronavirus and the reality that the pandemic continues to choke global demand. Also in focus are fresh hostilities between Beijing and Washington after U.S. President Donald Trump said he was watching closely whether China would meet its commitments to increase U.S. goods purchases under the Phase 1 trade deal.

  • World stocks climb on China trade relief, while U.S. jobs data dents dollar
    Reuters

    World stocks climb on China trade relief, while U.S. jobs data dents dollar

    World shares rose on Thursday after China's exports came in far stronger than expected, suggesting an economic recovery was under way, but the dollar fell from two-week highs as U.S. data showed millions more Americans joined the ranks of the unemployed. Gold jumped 2% as the weak U.S. data heightened fears over a coronavirus-induced global downturn. Initial U.S. jobless claims for unemployment benefits totaled a seasonally adjusted 3.169 million for the week ended May 2, down from a revised 3.846 million in the prior week, the Labor Department's weekly report showed.

  • India's services activity collapses as coronavirus paralyses global economy - PMI
    Reuters

    India's services activity collapses as coronavirus paralyses global economy - PMI

    India's services activity suffered a shock collapse in April as the coronavirus lockdown crippled global demand, causing a historic spike in layoffs and reinforcing fears of a deep recession in Asia's third-largest economy, a private survey showed. The grim result for the industry, the engine of economic growth and jobs, underlined the pandemic's sweeping impact across India as authorities extended a nationwide lockdown, in effect since March 25, until May 17. The Nikkei/IHS Markit Services Purchasing Managers' Index plunged to an eye-popping 5.4 in April from March's 49.3, an unprecedented contraction since the survey first began over 14 years ago.

  • India's factory activity slumped to record low in April: PMI
    Reuters

    India's factory activity slumped to record low in April: PMI

    India's manufacturing activity contracted at its sharpest pace on record in April as a lockdown to combat the rapid spread of the coronavirus led to a slump in demand and massive supply chain disruptions, a private sector survey showed on Monday. Asia's third largest economy is taking a huge hit from the ongoing nationwide lockdown, which started on March 25, and its gross domestic product is expected to shrink for the first time since the mid-1990s this quarter, a Reuters poll showed last month. "After making it through March relatively unscathed, the Indian manufacturing sector felt the full force of the coronavirus pandemic in April," noted Eliot Kerr, economist at IHS Markit.

  • Stocks slide as Amazon, other companies detail virus fallout
    Associated Press

    Stocks slide as Amazon, other companies detail virus fallout

    Stocks closed broadly lower on Wall Street Friday after Amazon and other big companies reported disappointing results, the latest evidence of how the coronavirus pandemic is hobbling the economy and hurting corporate earnings. A day after closing out its best month since 1987, the S&P 500 fell 2.8%. The selling accelerated as the day went on, with energy stocks taking the biggest losses.

  • Asian shares fall after Wall St slips on grim economic news
    Associated Press

    Asian shares fall after Wall St slips on grim economic news

    Most regional markets were closed for May Day holidays. Futures for the S&P 500 and Dow industrials were more than 1% lower. The S&P 500 fell 0.9% on Thursday after reports showed millions more U.S. workers filed for unemployment benefits last week and the European economy crumpled to its worst performance on record last quarter, among other lowlights.

  • Stocks fall as Trump's China tariff threat adds to fears over virus-hit economies
    Reuters

    Stocks fall as Trump's China tariff threat adds to fears over virus-hit economies

    A threat by President Donald Trump to impose new tariffs on China in retaliation for its handling of the novel coronavirus outbreak soured investor sentiment.London, Tokyo and New York markets were all open on Friday, although much of Europe and Asia were closed for International Workers' Day. The pandemic, which has cost more than 60,000 lives in the United States alone, has sparked a steep economic contraction and is threatening Trump's chances of re-election in November. "A rise in tension between China and the U.S. certainly could have a negative impact on the U.S. economy and business confidence, which is already hurt from the shutdowns," said Carin Pai, director of equity management at Fiduciary Trust International in New York.

  • Global equities dip at end of best month since '09
    Reuters

    Global equities dip at end of best month since '09

    World equity benchmarks dipped on Thursday to close their best month in 11 years as a rebound in oil prices, encouraging early results from a COVID-19 treatment trial and expectations of more government stimulus helped ease the pain of February and March. Safe-haven assets including the dollar and government bonds were little changed, reflecting an unsettled market weighed down by concerns about containing the coronavirus outbreak and jobs data in the United States that was worse than expected. "It's a hope-based rally rather than an evidence-based rally," said Anthony Doyle, cross-asset specialist at fund manager Fidelity International in Sydney.

  • Stocks rally on treatment hopes, currencies await ECB
    Reuters

    Stocks rally on treatment hopes, currencies await ECB

    Asian stocks rose to a seven-week high on Thursday, boosted by encouraging early results from a COVID-19 treatment trial, though bonds and currencies stuck to cautious ranges ahead of a European Central Bank meeting later in the day. A 1.4% rise in MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares, excluding Japan, <.MIAPJ0000PUS> has it tracking toward a weekly gain of more than 5%, its best in three weeks. Optimism in equity markets was driven by positive partial results from a trial of Gilead's <GILD.O> antiviral remdesivir, which showed the drug could help speed recovery from COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the new coronavirus.

  • Shares jump on coronavirus treatment hopes, oil soars
    Reuters

    Shares jump on coronavirus treatment hopes, oil soars

    World stock markets rose sharply on Wednesday following encouraging news for an experimental COVID-19 treatment and some positive earnings reports, while beaten-up oil prices soared. A top U.S. health official said Gilead Sciences Inc's <GILD.O> antiviral drug remdesivir is likely to become the standard of care for COVID-19 after early results from a clinical trial showed it helped certain patients recover more quickly from the illness caused by the coronavirus. The Federal Reserve left interest rates near zero and repeated a vow to use its "full range of tools" to shore up the U.S. economy amid an ongoing coronavirus pandemic that will not only slam growth in the near term but pose "considerable risks" in the medium term as well.

  • Asian stocks gain after France, Spain unveil reopening plans
    Associated Press

    Asian stocks gain after France, Spain unveil reopening plans

    Asian stock markets gained Wednesday after France and Spain joined governments that plan to ease anti-virus controls and allow businesses to reopen. Benchmarks in Shanghai, Hong Kong, Sydney and Southeast Asia advanced. Wall Street retreated overnight, hurt by declines in health care and tech stocks that have been among the winners during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Asia stocks set to rise as Wall Street jumps on lockdown easing hopes
    Reuters

    Asia stocks set to rise as Wall Street jumps on lockdown easing hopes

    Asian stocks were set for gains on Tuesday after a strong Wall Street session as easing lockdown restrictions by some countries and U.S. states buoyed sentiment, despite another decline in oil prices. While some investors believe the worst may soon be over for the world economy, Commonwealth Bank of Australia said there were still plenty of reasons to be cautious.

  • Stocks rise despite mixed earnings while investors weigh easing of lockdowns
    Reuters

    Stocks rise despite mixed earnings while investors weigh easing of lockdowns

    Stock markets across the globe eked out gains on Tuesday, riding out sharp swings on Wall Street as mixed corporate earnings results and dramatic moves in oil prices delivered yet another dose of investor jitters. A predictive model showed the outbreak could take more than 74,000 U.S. lives by August, compared with an earlier forecast of 67,000, if the lockdown were to be lifted too early. "There seems to be a conflict of opinion about the proper course of action," said Andre Bakhos, managing director at New Vines Capital LLC in Bernardsville, New Jersey.

  • Reuters

    Japan's SMFG, SBI to form smartphone service tie-up - Nikkei

    Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group Inc <8316.T> will tie up with internet brokerage SBI Holdings <8473.T> in a smartphone service business, the Nikkei newspaper reported on Monday, adding the two firms are expected to reach an agreement this week. SMFG in June will acquire a 20% stake in SBI NeoMobile Securities, a online brokerage specialized for smartphones, which is worth a few billion yen, the Nikkei said. SMFG is also considering a capital tie-up with SBI Holdings, the Nikkei reported.

  • Asia shares mixed, eyeing economies reopening, central banks
    Associated Press

    Asia shares mixed, eyeing economies reopening, central banks

    Asian shares are mixed Tuesday as governments inch toward letting businesses reopen and central banks step in to provide cash to economies. Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 lost earlier gains, dipping 0.4% to 19,706.19. Hong Kong's Hang Seng rose 0.2% to 24,329.34, while the Shanghai Composite fell nearly 0.2% to 2,811.09.

  • Shares jump on lockdown easing hopes; oil drops further
    Reuters

    Shares jump on lockdown easing hopes; oil drops further

    Stocks rose across the globe on Monday as investors cheered news that more countries and U.S. states were looking to ease lockdowns and the Bank of Japan expanded its stimulus program, while the price of oil continued to crumble as storage runs out. New York state will not reopen for weeks, at the soonest. The Bank of Japan kicked off a week of central bank meetings by pledging to buy unlimited amounts of government bonds, continuing a trend of historic stimulus announcements to offset the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Japan March factory output, retail sales seen falling at sharper rate as virus hits: Reuters poll
    Reuters

    Japan March factory output, retail sales seen falling at sharper rate as virus hits: Reuters poll

    Both Japan's factory output and retail sales likely fell at a sharper pace in March as the coronavirus pandemic weighed more heavily across the broader economy, a Reuters poll showed. A marked slowdown in export and domestic demand since the crisis began is widely believed to have pushed the world's third-largest economy into recession, though analysts do expect some improvement in the second half of the year if there are signs that the outbreak is being contained. "We expect the factory output dropped significantly due to poor auto sales in the United States and Europe, supply chain disruptions and damage to investment appetite due to an increasing uncertainty for the outlook," said Takumi Tsunoda, senior economist at Shinkin Central Bank Research Institute.

  • Wall Street ends manic week with a gain, led by tech stocks
    Associated Press

    Wall Street ends manic week with a gain, led by tech stocks

    In a manic week full of previously unthinkable market moves, Wall Street ended Friday with one reminiscent of what things were like before the coronavirus outbreak upended everything. The S&P 500 glided to a gain of 1.4%, with Apple, Microsoft and other technology stocks leading the way, as they did so many times before the economy shut down in hopes of slowing the spread of the outbreak. The bond market was quiet, while crude prices climbed again.

  • Global stocks fall on worries over EU stimulus details, coronavirus drug
    Reuters

    Global stocks fall on worries over EU stimulus details, coronavirus drug

    Global shares fell on Friday, hit by delays to an agreement on divisive details of the European Union's stimulus package and doubts about progress in the development of drugs to treat COVID-19. European stocks were 0.3% lower, with London's FTSE 100 shedding 0.6% as data showed UK retail sales crashed in March. "It's a negative session," said François Savary, chief investment officer at Swiss wealth manager Prime Partners.

  • Stocks struggle with muddled government pandemic responses
    Reuters

    Stocks struggle with muddled government pandemic responses

    Global equity benchmarks struggled on Friday as some U.S. states began reopening businesses despite the disapproval of health experts, and as the European Union put off addressing details of its new economic rescue plan. Safe-haven government bonds edged up while the dollar slipped, reflecting the market's unsettled direction. Investors are watching for health data from early-opening states to learn if they acted too quickly, said Stan Shipley, macro research analyst for Evercore ISI.

  • Asian shares lower as Wall St rally fizzles, oil rebounds
    Associated Press

    Asian shares lower as Wall St rally fizzles, oil rebounds

    Asian shares are lower Friday after an early rally on Wall Street suddenly vanished, the latest example of how fragile the hopes underpinning the stock market’s monthlong recovery are. It’s a microcosm of the extreme swings that have gripped markets for months, as investors struggle to set prices for where corporate profits and the economy will be months from now.

  • Reuters

    Japan to block foreign acquisitions of drug and ventilator makers - Nikkei

    Japan plans to block foreign companies from acquiring domestic drug and medical equipment makers, to protect access to medicine and ventilators that have proven critical amid the coronavirus outbreak, a media report said on Wednesday. The Japanese government will add companies that specialise in vaccines, medicine and advanced medical equipment to its list of businesses deemed critical to national security, the Nikkei financial daily said. The move comes as Japan's Fujifilm Holdings Corp's <4901.T> has gained global attention for its anti-flu drug Avigan, which is being tested as a treatment for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus.

  • Jump in oil sends global equities higher; bonds dip
    Reuters

    Jump in oil sends global equities higher; bonds dip

    A jump in the price of oil and the promise of more government stimulus to ease the economic pain inflicted by the coronavirus pandemic helped global equity markets surge on Wednesday, prompting investors to edge out of perceived safe-haven assets like U.S. Treasuries.