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Trump demands three Republican groups stop raising money off his name

·2-min read
Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Former President Donald Trump has clashed again with his Republican Party, demanding that three Republican groups stop using his name and likeness for fundraising, a Trump adviser said on Saturday.

The adviser, confirming a report in Politico, said lawyers for Trump on Friday had sent cease-and-desist letters to the Republican National Committee, National Republican Congressional Campaign and National Republican Senate Campaign, asking them to stop using his name and likeness on fundraising emails and merchandise.

The adviser said Trump is sensitive to the use of his name and likeness for branding purposes and was irked that the three groups have supported Republican lawmakers who joined Democrats in voting to impeach him over the Jan. 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol by pro-Trump protesters.

Related: Civil war within the GOP continues

Trump is using his Save America SuperPAC to raise money in part to help hand-picked Republican candidates in the 2022 congressional elections. Some of them are expected to challenge Republican incumbents.

A civil war has erupted within the Republican Party, with establishment figures such as Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell eager to put Trump in the rearview mirror, and others, like Trump ally Senator Lindsey Graham, believing the party’s future depends on the energy of the pro-Trump base.

Trump has waged a war of words with establishment Republicans, some of whom he feels betrayed him by joining Democrats in impeaching him.

Trump, now living at his Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida, dangled the possibility of running for president again in 2024 when he addressed a conference of conservatives last Sunday.

In that speech, he singled out Republicans Senators Mitt Romney and Pat Toomey and House lawmakers Liz Cheney and Adam Kinzinger, suggesting he would support candidates who opposed them in Republican primaries.

Still, Trump has committed to helping Republicans try to win control of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate in 2022 congressional elections that will be a first referendum on the leadership of Democratic President Joe Biden.

(Reporting by Steve Holland; Editing by Leslie Adler and David Gregorio)