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Across the divide

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Across the divide

French singer Eléonore Fourniau brought the tunes of the Kurdish people to life on her hurdy gurdy, while Indian musician Nandini Shankar played classical raags on her violin. 

On Wednesday evening, the collaboration between the Kurdish music of Turkey, and the Hindustani classical music of India was heard as two very different musicians took the stage at Alliance Francaise, Delhi , for the Queens of Melody' concert. French singer Eléonore Fourniau brought the tunes of the Kurdish people to life on her hurdy gurdy, while Indian musician Nandini Shankar played classical raags on her violin.

The duo had been accompanied by the talented Abhishek Mishra on the tabla. Shankar revealed, The two of us had been exchanging our works for the past 10 days, and now we will see how the two merge together on the stage. She added, One of the pieces the two of us will perform together is a combination of the raag Basant Mukhari with a Kurdish form of music, which is the equivalent of the Indian raag.

Fourniau adds, These pieces of Kurdish music are traditional village songs. It's exciting to hear how these forms will sound when they have been merged. She goes on to describe how she had first been trained to play the piano, and how she came to play the hurdy gurdy, which she has been playing for the past 10 years.

I had come to study music in Istanbul, and I had planned to stay there for a year. I stayed much longer, as I learned about Kurdish music, and the hurdy gurdy, a remarkable instrument. Shankar and Mishra disclosed that they had studied music from an early age, explaining how first it had been a family tradition, then a choice they had made. Fourniau went on to say The best part of this exercise is how much we have learned from each other. It was also great making the rhythm include all our instruments. The music we created together is beyond languages.