Blog Posts by Simplus Information Services

  • Etihad Airways PJSC increased its financial support for Air Berlin Plc after the unprofitable German carrier failed to convince bondholders to wait an extra nine months for repayment. Bloomberg's Tracy Alloway reports on "Bloomberg Markets: Middle East."

    More from Bloomberg.com

    Read Why Etihad Airways Increased Air Berlin Support on bloomberg.com

    Read More »from Why Etihad Airways Increased Air Berlin Support
  • Iraqi troops advance on western Mosul as Mattis holds talks

    SOUTH OF MOSUL, Iraq (AP) — Iraqi forces advanced Monday into the southern outskirts of Mosul on the second day of a push to drive Islamic State militants from the city's western half, as the visiting U.S. defense secretary met with officials to discuss the fight against the extremists.

    With aerial support from the U.S.-led coalition, Iraqi police and army troops launched the offensive Sunday, part of a 100-day-old campaign that has already driven the militants from the eastern half of the city.

    Iraqi helicopters fired rockets at the village of Abu Saif early Monday, targeting a hill that overlooks the city's airport. By noon, the forces entered the village and gained control over much of the strategic hill as fighting was still raging.

    Separately, militarized police in armored vehicles were moving toward the sprawling Ghazlani military base on the southwestern outskirts of the city.

    A U.S.-led coalition has been providing close air support throughout the campaign to retake Iraq's

    Read More »from Iraqi troops advance on western Mosul as Mattis holds talks
  • Rio Carnival revelers hunt for bargains amid economic crisis

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Instead of costly and elaborate costumes with glittering sequins, expect more cheap getups featuring fake mustaches, hats and tiaras at this year's Carnival.

    Revelers are bargain-hunting ahead of Rio de Janeiro's world famous party, which is about to kick off amid a prolonged economic crisis that is hurting pocketbooks and the myriad businesses that depend on the bash for a large part of their annual incomes.

    Many parade tickets have not been sold, sponsors have declined to pony up for street parties and hotels are expected to be emptier than last year's also disappointing blast, when worries about the Zika virus kept some foreign tourists away and the recession depressed local spending.

    "Last year was not great, but we still had the 2016 Olympics as a peg to Carnival. Now we can feel there is a reduction," said Cristina Fritsch, head of Rio's travel agents association. "Security is also making people worry at a time when public servants, including the police, are

    Read More »from Rio Carnival revelers hunt for bargains amid economic crisis
  • [$$] Sound and fury will fail to help Britain make the best of Brexit

    A letter from Theresa May, the UK prime minister, will land on the desk of European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker on the 13th floor of the Berlaymont in Brussels in a month's time, marking the end of the beginning of the process by which Britain will leave the EU.

    Too often since June, it has seemed as though Brexit is just a private matter for the UK, as politicians endlessly re-fight the referendum. Former prime minister Tony Blair's call to arms to Remainers last week is a case in point. His appeal to man the barricades and dig in will merely unleash a new round of sound and fury, and make sensible debate more difficult.

    It is time British politicians stopped talking only to each other and started speaking to the rest of Europe. There are not three people in this marriage: there are 28. Just as urgent, instead of rehashing old arguments, we need to spend much more time thinking about the future, about the country we want to be and the economy we want to have.

    Read More »from [$$] Sound and fury will fail to help Britain make the best of Brexit
  • [$$] Women head back to work with 'returnships'

    At 51, Cathy McDonnell wanted to put her Oxford physics degree and former experience crunching data at Qinetiq to better use. She had worked part-time in a school for several years while her three children were young, but she wanted to get back into the corporate world.

    Several applications later, all for jobs in her former field of defence, she was getting nowhere. Then a friend told her about "returnships", a form of later-life work experience that some companies are experimenting with to help older people - mainly women - return to work, often after breaks to care for families.

    Ms McDonnell eventually secured a place on an 11-week "Career Returners" programme with O2, open to men and women, which included being buddied with a 20-year-old male student who was also with the company on work experience. He helped to acquaint her with new technology, such as using an iPhone and accessing the company's virtual private network from her laptop so she could work from home but still

    Read More »from [$$] Women head back to work with 'returnships'
  • [$$] Why Coco is still Chanel's biggest asset

    The house of Chanel is synonymous with its founder. Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel remains at the heart of the creative vision of the design house she opened over 100 years ago. Karl Lagerfeld, Chanel's creative director since 1983, has always deferred to her influence, and her mythology has provided a rich stream of product launches.

    Chanel will exploit this heritage further in a new collection of Gabrielle handbags and a fragrance and it will unveil in 2017. Coco's character has also provided the basis for a series of four short films that will be released throughout the year around the themes of rebellion, freedom, passion and allure.

    Gabrielle Chanel the fragrance, the house's first new women's scent to launch in 15 years, will hit the market later this year and will be priced 20 per cent higher than its existing perfume ranges.

    Sales have been strong in recent months, according to Christine Dagousset, president of fragrance and beauty. "Fragrances and make-up led the growth

    Read More »from [$$] Why Coco is still Chanel's biggest asset
  • [$$] Big pharma bets billions on 'silent' liver disease

    Big pharma thinks it has spotted its next big opportunity - an untreatable silent killer that affects millions of people.

    In recent months, large drugmakers including Allergan, Gilead and Novartis have collectively spent billions of dollars acquiring or licensing medicines designed to treat a liver disease that few people have heard of - non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, or Nash.

    This advanced form of fatty liver disease causes scarring and inflammation of the liver and is thought to affect more than 16m people in the US, according to Bernstein, the investment bank.

    In the most serious cases, the illness causes fatal cirrhosis, while also increasing a person's chances of developing liver cancer or heart disease. The US Centers for Disease Control believes there are roughly 20,000 fatalities each year from chronic liver disease or cirrhosis that are not related to alcoholism.

    More from the Financial Times

    Read More »from [$$] Big pharma bets billions on 'silent' liver disease
  • Medrobotics® Closes $20MM Financing To Expand Into General Surgery And Build Next Generation Robot System

    Development of Multiple New Surgical Applications and Next Generation Robotic System to Fuel Future Growth of Company’s Flex® Surgical Platform

    RAYNHAM, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

    Medrobotics Corp., a medical products company, today announced closing a $20 Million Preferred Stock financing. Existing Medrobotics shareholders participated in the round. Proceeds will be used to fund the Company’s expansion into new surgical applications, such as single-port general and gynecological surgeries, and to develop its next generation Flex® Robotic System with more fully robotic instrument options.

    This Smart News Release features multimedia. View the full release here: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170220005705/en/

    Medrobotics will continue to pursue scarless ENT, colorectal and gynecological procedures to be performed through natural body orifices with the world’s first and only commercially released steerable and shapeable robotic surgical products. Additionally, the Company will develop the Flex® Robotic System for single port

    Read More »from Medrobotics® Closes $20MM Financing To Expand Into General Surgery And Build Next Generation Robot System
    Contact:
    Medrobotics Corporation
    Kevin Knight, 214-732-9392
  • [$$] How to decode Greece's odd bond market

    The International Monetary Fund's description of Greek debt as potentially explosive has left negotiators in Brussels struggling to bridge the differences between Athens and its creditors before time runs out to avert default.

    With creditors unwilling to release the next tranche of bailout money needed to keep the country afloat, Greece is facing ?7bn of debt redemptions in July that it cannot afford.

    Investors appear to have given up on a resolution being found before Europe's busy election calendar begins, prompting a sell-off in Greek debt that has pushed the yield on two-year bonds to an eight-month high.

    Yet the tumult is mild when compared to previous crises. To understand the message Greek bonds are delivering about the country means understanding the market's oddities.

    More from the Financial Times

    Read More »from [$$] How to decode Greece's odd bond market
  • [$$] Funding cuts threaten to reverse London schools' progress

    After a chequered past, the Urswick secondary school in Hackney, east London, is running smoothly. Results are improving, the gang violence of the previous decade has been brought under control and unruly pupils no longer terrorise the hallways. But far from being pleased with this progress Richard Brown, Urswick's headmaster, is afraid it is all about to be undone.

    Under a new formula designed to distribute school funding more fairly, Hackney, like most inner-London boroughs, will lose money so that other parts of England, such as Torbay, Plymouth and Blackpool, can receive more.

    Ministers argue that the current funding arrangements, which have favoured schools in the capital - and helped drive significant progress there - are based on an anachronistic calculation that meant Tower Hamlets received £7,007 per pupil while Wokingham was awarded only £4,151.

    Headteachers in Hackney, Camden, Lambeth and Lewisham will suffer the deepest losses, losing 2.8 per cent of their

    Read More »from [$$] Funding cuts threaten to reverse London schools' progress

Blog Posts by Simplus Information Services

  • Etihad Airways PJSC increased its financial support for Air Berlin Plc after the unprofitable German carrier failed to convince bondholders to wait an extra nine months for repayment. Bloomberg's Tracy Alloway reports on "Bloomberg Markets: Middle East."

    More from Bloomberg.com

    Read Why Etihad Airways Increased Air Berlin Support on bloomberg.com

    Read More »from Why Etihad Airways Increased Air Berlin Support
  • Iraqi troops advance on western Mosul as Mattis holds talks

    SOUTH OF MOSUL, Iraq (AP) — Iraqi forces advanced Monday into the southern outskirts of Mosul on the second day of a push to drive Islamic State militants from the city's western half, as the visiting U.S. defense secretary met with officials to discuss the fight against the extremists.

    With aerial support from the U.S.-led coalition, Iraqi police and army troops launched the offensive Sunday, part of a 100-day-old campaign that has already driven the militants from the eastern half of the city.

    Iraqi helicopters fired rockets at the village of Abu Saif early Monday, targeting a hill that overlooks the city's airport. By noon, the forces entered the village and gained control over much of the strategic hill as fighting was still raging.

    Separately, militarized police in armored vehicles were moving toward the sprawling Ghazlani military base on the southwestern outskirts of the city.

    A U.S.-led coalition has been providing close air support throughout the campaign to retake Iraq's

    Read More »from Iraqi troops advance on western Mosul as Mattis holds talks
  • Rio Carnival revelers hunt for bargains amid economic crisis

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Instead of costly and elaborate costumes with glittering sequins, expect more cheap getups featuring fake mustaches, hats and tiaras at this year's Carnival.

    Revelers are bargain-hunting ahead of Rio de Janeiro's world famous party, which is about to kick off amid a prolonged economic crisis that is hurting pocketbooks and the myriad businesses that depend on the bash for a large part of their annual incomes.

    Many parade tickets have not been sold, sponsors have declined to pony up for street parties and hotels are expected to be emptier than last year's also disappointing blast, when worries about the Zika virus kept some foreign tourists away and the recession depressed local spending.

    "Last year was not great, but we still had the 2016 Olympics as a peg to Carnival. Now we can feel there is a reduction," said Cristina Fritsch, head of Rio's travel agents association. "Security is also making people worry at a time when public servants, including the police, are

    Read More »from Rio Carnival revelers hunt for bargains amid economic crisis
  • [$$] Sound and fury will fail to help Britain make the best of Brexit

    A letter from Theresa May, the UK prime minister, will land on the desk of European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker on the 13th floor of the Berlaymont in Brussels in a month's time, marking the end of the beginning of the process by which Britain will leave the EU.

    Too often since June, it has seemed as though Brexit is just a private matter for the UK, as politicians endlessly re-fight the referendum. Former prime minister Tony Blair's call to arms to Remainers last week is a case in point. His appeal to man the barricades and dig in will merely unleash a new round of sound and fury, and make sensible debate more difficult.

    It is time British politicians stopped talking only to each other and started speaking to the rest of Europe. There are not three people in this marriage: there are 28. Just as urgent, instead of rehashing old arguments, we need to spend much more time thinking about the future, about the country we want to be and the economy we want to have.

    Read More »from [$$] Sound and fury will fail to help Britain make the best of Brexit
  • [$$] Women head back to work with 'returnships'

    At 51, Cathy McDonnell wanted to put her Oxford physics degree and former experience crunching data at Qinetiq to better use. She had worked part-time in a school for several years while her three children were young, but she wanted to get back into the corporate world.

    Several applications later, all for jobs in her former field of defence, she was getting nowhere. Then a friend told her about "returnships", a form of later-life work experience that some companies are experimenting with to help older people - mainly women - return to work, often after breaks to care for families.

    Ms McDonnell eventually secured a place on an 11-week "Career Returners" programme with O2, open to men and women, which included being buddied with a 20-year-old male student who was also with the company on work experience. He helped to acquaint her with new technology, such as using an iPhone and accessing the company's virtual private network from her laptop so she could work from home but still

    Read More »from [$$] Women head back to work with 'returnships'
  • [$$] Why Coco is still Chanel's biggest asset

    The house of Chanel is synonymous with its founder. Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel remains at the heart of the creative vision of the design house she opened over 100 years ago. Karl Lagerfeld, Chanel's creative director since 1983, has always deferred to her influence, and her mythology has provided a rich stream of product launches.

    Chanel will exploit this heritage further in a new collection of Gabrielle handbags and a fragrance and it will unveil in 2017. Coco's character has also provided the basis for a series of four short films that will be released throughout the year around the themes of rebellion, freedom, passion and allure.

    Gabrielle Chanel the fragrance, the house's first new women's scent to launch in 15 years, will hit the market later this year and will be priced 20 per cent higher than its existing perfume ranges.

    Sales have been strong in recent months, according to Christine Dagousset, president of fragrance and beauty. "Fragrances and make-up led the growth

    Read More »from [$$] Why Coco is still Chanel's biggest asset
  • [$$] Big pharma bets billions on 'silent' liver disease

    Big pharma thinks it has spotted its next big opportunity - an untreatable silent killer that affects millions of people.

    In recent months, large drugmakers including Allergan, Gilead and Novartis have collectively spent billions of dollars acquiring or licensing medicines designed to treat a liver disease that few people have heard of - non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, or Nash.

    This advanced form of fatty liver disease causes scarring and inflammation of the liver and is thought to affect more than 16m people in the US, according to Bernstein, the investment bank.

    In the most serious cases, the illness causes fatal cirrhosis, while also increasing a person's chances of developing liver cancer or heart disease. The US Centers for Disease Control believes there are roughly 20,000 fatalities each year from chronic liver disease or cirrhosis that are not related to alcoholism.

    More from the Financial Times

    Read More »from [$$] Big pharma bets billions on 'silent' liver disease
  • Medrobotics® Closes $20MM Financing To Expand Into General Surgery And Build Next Generation Robot System

    Development of Multiple New Surgical Applications and Next Generation Robotic System to Fuel Future Growth of Company’s Flex® Surgical Platform

    RAYNHAM, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

    Medrobotics Corp., a medical products company, today announced closing a $20 Million Preferred Stock financing. Existing Medrobotics shareholders participated in the round. Proceeds will be used to fund the Company’s expansion into new surgical applications, such as single-port general and gynecological surgeries, and to develop its next generation Flex® Robotic System with more fully robotic instrument options.

    This Smart News Release features multimedia. View the full release here: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170220005705/en/

    Medrobotics will continue to pursue scarless ENT, colorectal and gynecological procedures to be performed through natural body orifices with the world’s first and only commercially released steerable and shapeable robotic surgical products. Additionally, the Company will develop the Flex® Robotic System for single port

    Read More »from Medrobotics® Closes $20MM Financing To Expand Into General Surgery And Build Next Generation Robot System
    Contact:
    Medrobotics Corporation
    Kevin Knight, 214-732-9392
  • [$$] How to decode Greece's odd bond market

    The International Monetary Fund's description of Greek debt as potentially explosive has left negotiators in Brussels struggling to bridge the differences between Athens and its creditors before time runs out to avert default.

    With creditors unwilling to release the next tranche of bailout money needed to keep the country afloat, Greece is facing ?7bn of debt redemptions in July that it cannot afford.

    Investors appear to have given up on a resolution being found before Europe's busy election calendar begins, prompting a sell-off in Greek debt that has pushed the yield on two-year bonds to an eight-month high.

    Yet the tumult is mild when compared to previous crises. To understand the message Greek bonds are delivering about the country means understanding the market's oddities.

    More from the Financial Times

    Read More »from [$$] How to decode Greece's odd bond market
  • [$$] Funding cuts threaten to reverse London schools' progress

    After a chequered past, the Urswick secondary school in Hackney, east London, is running smoothly. Results are improving, the gang violence of the previous decade has been brought under control and unruly pupils no longer terrorise the hallways. But far from being pleased with this progress Richard Brown, Urswick's headmaster, is afraid it is all about to be undone.

    Under a new formula designed to distribute school funding more fairly, Hackney, like most inner-London boroughs, will lose money so that other parts of England, such as Torbay, Plymouth and Blackpool, can receive more.

    Ministers argue that the current funding arrangements, which have favoured schools in the capital - and helped drive significant progress there - are based on an anachronistic calculation that meant Tower Hamlets received £7,007 per pupil while Wokingham was awarded only £4,151.

    Headteachers in Hackney, Camden, Lambeth and Lewisham will suffer the deepest losses, losing 2.8 per cent of their

    Read More »from [$$] Funding cuts threaten to reverse London schools' progress

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